Tag Archives: children

New from Saguaro Books

BookCoverImage

List Price: $11.95

6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
274 pages

ISBN-13: 978-1548323608

ISBN-10: 1548323608
BISAC: Juvenile Fiction / Fantasy & Magic

Would you risk everything just to be cool?

Young Duggan McDuggan really has no choice. Her habit of talking to trees has made her the most teased kid in her village. Duggan would love to stop the teasing but there’s no way she’s going to give up her tree friends. And so she’s worked out a daring plan to journey with her two best friends to Eshmagick, ancient realm of the Faeries. This will certainly stop the teasing. No one in five hundred years has made it there and back again.

For their dangerous journey, Duggan and her friends will need a Faerie guide. Unfortunately, legend says harming a Faerie will bring down a terrible curse and it’s hard to catch a Faerie without hurting it. But when you’re as desperate as Duggan, no curse is too scary to stop you.

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under publishing, Uncategorized, writing

Available on Amazon…

ThunderNew1800x2700

 

Have you met Thunder yet?

We have new middle grade cover art that was commissioned by Disney’s/ Dreamworks animator Lenord Robinson. We are proud of this series. Please add this children’s book to your reading collection. Our goal is to have Thunder and his friends become global ambassadors to stop poaching and have children recognize and take away the message.

Thanks for looking,

Erik Shein, Author

https://www.amazon.com/Thunder-Elephants-Erik-Daniel-Shein-ebook/dp/B01N4BKEZL/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1505920649&sr=8-1&keywords=Thunder+Erik+Shein

Leave a comment

Filed under publishing, Uncategorized, writing

Our next Author TakeOver Author

Our next author to be on the Author TakeOver Event is…Fran Orenstein
 
Fran Orenstein, Ed.D., published author and poet, also edits both poetry and prose. She wrote her first poem at age eight and has written and published academically and professionally since then. This included working as a magazine editor and writer, writing political speeches and material for state government and writing newsletters for various organizations. Her author credits include eleven published books, including middle grade novels, young adult novels, a contemporary adult novel and two adult mysteries, plus a book of poetry, and…there are more books waiting in the wings. Visit Fran’s World at http://www.franorenstein.com for more information.
Her academic credentials are B.A. in Early Childhood Education from CUNY’s Brooklyn College; M.Ed. in Counseling Psych from The College of NJ; and, Ed.D. in Child & Youth Studies from Nova Southeastern University.
 
She has authored many books for children and young adults:
Shadow Boy Mystery Series: Mystery under Third Base – Book 1, Mystery of the Green Goblin – Book 2, Mystery of the Stolen Painting – Book 3, Mystery in Gram’s Attic – Book 4.
Also by Fran Orenstein: The Spice Trader’s Daughter; The Calling of the Flute; Fat Girls from Outer Space; Fat Girls from Outer Space; a Graphic Novel

Leave a comment

Filed under publishing, Uncategorized, writing

Rules Beginning Writers Should Never Break

We often talk about the “rules” of writing for kids citing proper page lengths and

story types for different age groups. A better term would probably be “guidelines”;

these rules exist only to tell you what, in general, editors like to see in the

manuscripts sent to them. And, of course, for every rule there are numerous

exceptions. But while we’d all like to think our book is strong enough to override the

guidelines, this is usually not the case. Here are some rules that shouldn’t be broken

until you a best-selling author:

 

Write Within Designated Word Lengths

No editor is going to turn down a terrific book just because the text length falls

outside the average guidelines. If your young adult novel is complete in 100 pages,

there’s no sense padding the manuscript simply because most YAs are longer. But

length guidelines are there for a reason — publishers have determined about how

much text kids of different ages can read, and so it behooves you to try to stay as

close to those guidelines as possible.

 

Don’t Provide Testimonials in Queries

It’s nice to have lots of neighborhood kids read your manuscript and give you

positive feedback, but your potential editor doesn’t want to hear about it. Frankly,

editors don’t give much credence to testimonials from readers who may be family or

friends of the author. Also, don’t clutter up the query letter with ideas for why

children need your book or what they’ll learn from it. This is up to the editor to

decide. (One exception: You’ve written a nonfiction book and can show that there

aren’t any other books in print that cover the same subject.)

 

Keep your query letter tight, brief, and to the point. Provide an intriguing plot

synopsis or nonfiction outline, relevant information about yourself, and enclose a

self-addressed, stamped envelope. Sell your book, not your reasons for writing it.

 

Don’t Write a Series Before Selling the First Book

I’ve critiqued many manuscripts from authors who say, “I’ve got six more books

written with these characters. Should I mention that to the editor when I submit my

manuscript?” My answer is always no. Unless an editor is specifically looking for new

series proposals, and the books were written from the start to form a series, this is a

bad idea. Realize that series are created as a group of books that are bound

together by some sort of hook; in fiction, it might be a club the main characters

form, a neighborhood they all live in, or a cause they champion. In nonfiction, it’s a

topic (natural sciences, biographies) and an age group. Rarely do you see picture

book fiction series. What does happen is a character may become very popular with

readers and the author is asked to write another book featuring the same cast.

These fiction “series” actually grow slowly one book at a time.

 

So, unless you’ve conceived your books as a traditional series and are able to

send a thought-out series proposal to the editor, stick to selling one book. When an

editor sees you have numerous manuscripts featuring the same characters and

similar plots, she may feel that you’ve spent too much writing new material and not

enough time revising what you’ve already got. And remember, each book — series or

not — must stand on its own. It needs a strong beginning, well-developed middle,

and satisfying end. No fair leaving the ending unfinished with the intention of

continuing the story in the next book.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized, writing

Meeting and Exhibition

Saguaro Books, LLC  and Aquitaine, LTD will have a table at the American Association of School Librarians • 18th National Conference and Exhibition, November 9-11, 2017 at the Convention Center in Phoenix, AZ.

Hope you will visit us.

aasl17-web-badge-attendee-r1

Save

Leave a comment

Filed under publishing, Uncategorized, writing

A Girl Named Mary…A Review

A Review on Amazon…

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

Mary’s tale will attract and hold the attention of young readers – and even this adult (and demanding) one. The story begins on the eve of Jesus’ birth, then backtracks to that of Herod’s excesses, and the struggles of Mary’s parents, Anne and Joachim. We are there for Mary’s birth, girlhood, and adolescence, and witness her development into a virtuous yet occasionally rebellious and questioning adolescent, which gives her character depth and believability. She initially rails against her arranged marriage to the much-older Joseph, but at length accepts it with good grace. No angel of Annunciation serves as the harbinger of the special nature of the child Mary is to bear, and in fact her wedding day and the period that follows is very much presented as a typical Jewish marriage of the time. (It is a visiting blue-eyed Roman legionnaire who presents the only inkling to young Mary that she may be destined for greatness, an interesting and even arresting touch in the narrative.) Period details and Hebrew terms and customs are deftly integrated into the narrative, and Mary herself is presented as an intelligent, spirited, kind, and most of all, thoughtful actor in the immense drama she is central to. It takes ability and imagination to breathe life into a story as well-known as this one, and the author rewards every moment spent by the reader, providing a fresh, vital, and oftentimes surprising retelling of one of history’s most revered personalities.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized, writing

A Girl Named Mary

A Girl Named Mary tells the story of Mary, the Mother of Jesus as a young girl. Though she has a much older sister, she’s raised as an only child. Her cousin, Rebekka, is her closet friend and confidant. Together they grow and learn how to maneuver in a culture that is steeped in tradition. One that looks backward instead of forward for solutions to problems. Mary cares about others, helps the sick and disadvantaged and is a voice, albeit a young voice, for women.

At twelve, Mary was betrothed to an older man who had sons her age. She resisted this arrangement strongly. She argued with her parents against the betrothal with every bit of logic and strength she had but found this tradition beyond her ability to fight. The marriage took place and she was rewarded by the birth of a beautiful baby boy, Jesus.

Pre-order from Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01G7RXEJ8

A Girl Named Mary 3D Book Cover-1

Leave a comment

Filed under publishing, Uncategorized